New Zealand’s Autumn Splendour – Releases New Single “Jeff”

Autumn Splendour

Auckland trio, Autumn Splendour, released their fourth music video Jeff. The track was recorded in October 2012 with Nick Roughan, noted for his long history of recording and producing Flying Nun bands, as well as playing bass in legendary 80’s band, the Skeptics. As with his recent recordings for bands such as Die! Die! Die! and Mean Girls, Roughan melded the live intensity of Autumn Splendour’s raw and raucous sound with a polished studio recording.

Formed in 2009 in Auckland, New Zealand, Autumn Splendour plays short, catchy, primitive garage rock songs, tightly packaged in hypnotic, danceable riffs, killer-kitten vocals and pummeling drums. Guitarist/vocalist Natasha Cantwell and drummer Caitrin Roberts started the band with their friend Toby Barkley on bass, describing their sound as “garage party brat pop.”

Initially unleashed to unsuspecting crowds at house parties, within a few months they had recorded their debut self-titled six track EP. Determination. Released on vinyl rather than CD meant the seven-inch and lead single Toby weren’t released until March 2011. By this stage Barkley had moved to Dunedin and the band were headlining club nights across New Zealand with new bassist Ryan Perry. Perry’s more aggressive playing style brought a darker edge to the band’s music.

Autumn Splendour’s tongue-in-cheek songs are named after the friends who prove inspiration for the lyrics. No band member has managed to escape being turned into a song, with the band releasing the singles Natasha and Ryan in the lead up to their Melbourne tour in 2012. These were their first live shows outside of New Zealand.

May 2013 saw the band release their limited edition 10” vinyl EP that featured the five tracks they recorded with Nick Roughan. While the record has sold out, the tracks are still available for download from autumnsplendour.bandcamp.com

By Tom Tom Web

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